Mar 31, 2007

Haiku

About

Haiku is an open source operating system currently in development designed from the ground up for desktop computing. Inspired by the Be Operating System, Haiku aims to provide users of all levels with a personal computing experience that is simple yet powerful, and void of any unnecessary complexities.

Why Haiku?

As a tool, software is a means to an end, and not an end in itself. The Be Operating System introduced progressive concepts and technologies that we believe represent the ideal means to the end of desktop computing. Haiku will be the realization of those concepts and technologies in the form of an operating system that is open source and free.

Who We Are

Haiku is developed mostly by volunteers around the world in their spare time. Besides the core members, Haiku also exists thanks to the dedicated support of a fervent and friendly community, and that of Haiku Inc., a non-profit founded by Project Leader Michael Phipps with the purpose of supporting the development of the Haiku Operating System.

http://haiku-os.org



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GoogleOS: What To Expect




There's no such thing as the GoogleOS in reality - but despite that, it is one of the most talked about Web products. People can't stop discussing it - and even imagining screenshots for it! Seems like everyone expects Google to get into direct competition with Microsoft, by releasing an operating system. However Google refuses such claims and even makes fun of this kind of buzz. Nevertheless we decided to analyze where Google may be heading with their product strategy - and from that determine what are the chances of a GoogleOS.

Possibilities

We see 3 scenarios for a GoogleOS:

  • A web based desktop (i.e. operating system)
  • A full featured Linux distribution
  • A lightweight Linux distro and/or BIOS

We'll try to explain each of these in detail - then in the conclusion, make our prediction. What's more, we think this could be less than 6 months away from happening.

Read Full Article : Click



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Get sensitive information using Google

Google's advanced syntax lets you expose many vulnerabilities and gather confidential or sensitive information.



[ intitle: ]

The “intitle:” syntax helps Google restrict the search results to pages containing that word in the title. For example, “intitle: login password” (without quotes) will return links to those pages that has the word "login" in their title, and the word "password" anywhere in the page.

Similarly, if one has to query for more than one word in the page title then in that case “allintitle:” can be used instead of “intitle” to get the list of pages containing all those words in its title. For example using “intitle: login intitle: password” is same as querying “allintitle: login password”.

To Read Full Article :Click
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Mar 30, 2007

Mar 28, 2007

WinFx

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Online photo printing at your fingertips

To the delight of digital camera enthusiasts around the country, an innovative new online photo service has been released in Australia. Snapfish already the world’s number one online destination for printing, sharing and storing photos, has made its way to our shores and looks set to be quite the catch among snap-happy consumers.

Read Full Article : Click
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Oracle Developer Tools for Visual Studio .NET 10.1.0.4.0


Download the File

ODT10104.exe (187MB)

Release Notes
Installation instructions: Place downloaded file into a temporary directory and execute. After files have self extracted, run "setup.exe".
Important: If you are already using an Oracle8 or Oracle9 client installation, you must install Oracle Developer Tools for Visual Studio .NET in an Oracle10g Oracle home to avoid conflicts. (The installer will offer to install in a new Oracle10g home by default.)

Download Includes


Oracle Developer Tools for Visual Studio .NET 10.1.0.4.0

Oracle Data Provider for .NET 10.1.0.4.0

Oracle Client 10.1.0.2
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64-bit Oracle Data Access Components (ODAC) Beta Downloads

Oracle10g Release 2 ODAC (64-bit) 10.2.0.2 for Windows x64
Download the File


64-bit ODAC 10.2.0.2 Beta for Windows x64






Download Includes



64-bit Oracle Data Provider for .NET 2.0 10.2.0.2.21 Beta


64-bit Oracle Database Extensions for .NET 2.0 10.2.0.2.20 Beta


64-bit Oracle ODBC Driver 10.2.0.2.0


64-bit Oracle Provider for OLE DB 10.2.0.2.21


64-bit Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server 10.2.0.1.0
Oracle10g Release 2 ODAC (64-bit) 10.2.0.2 for Windows Itanium
Download the File


64-bit ODAC 10.2.0.2 Beta for Windows Itanium






Download Includes



64-bit Oracle Data Provider for .NET 2.0 10.2.0.2.21 Beta


64-bit Oracle Database Extensions for .NET 2.0 10.2.0.2.20 Beta


64-bit Oracle ODBC Driver 10.2.0.2.0


64-bit Oracle Provider for OLE DB 10.2.0.2.21


64-bit Oracle Services for Microsoft Transaction Server 10.2.0.1.0
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Mar 22, 2007

Web Client Software Factory Workshop

The Microsoft Patterns & Practices team held a workshop on the newly released Web Client Software Factory (WCSF) toolkit on March 12-13 in Redmond WA. The WCSF is the web client version of the Smart Client Software Factory (SCSF) that was released in early 2006. I was fortunate to be involved with Microsoft as a member of the Advisory Board that reviewed the software as it went from conception to release. Suffice it to say, Microsoft hit another home run with this handy addition to the tools available for web developers.

It brings a much needed architectural model to the back end of a web site while leveraging the best of ASP.NET and 3rd party vendors on the client side. You can learn more about the WCSF by going to the CodePlex site. There is a wealth of tutorials, programmer's guides, samples and other materials to assist you in getting started with this toolkit.

Watch the WCSF site for more notices on the March workshop (and future ones). Microsoft often releases the videos of these workshops for those who couldn't attend.

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Mar 20, 2007

Visual Studio My Learing Path - Microsoft

Welcome to the Beginner Developer Learning Center - a centralized learning environment specifically targeted to beginning programmers. Here you'll find a rich array of learning content that starts with the very basics, and guides you through step-by-step to becoming a fully-fledged developer!

No experience or programming knowledge required - so dive right in!

For an overview of all the lessons available on this site, see My Learning Path.

Click : Here



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Mar 15, 2007

CTP of Orcas

In the twisty-turns of my Web meanderings, I happened upon the blog of Eric Lee, whose website is dedicated to "all things Visual Studio Team System, Windows Vista and Windows Presentation Foundation."

In truly helpful fashion, Eric highlights a dozen new features that caught his eye in the March CTP release of Orcas. He provides a short summary and screen shot for each of the features shown below.

1. Code Metrics
2. Annotation View for Files under Version Control
3. Team Foundation Server Build Definition Editor
4. Build Retention Policy
5. Continuous Builds
6. Build Queues
7. Folder Differencing
8. Runtime Control of a Performance Session
9. Query View in Performance Reports
10. New Views in the Performance Reports
11. Integration with Work Item Tracking
12. Performance Report Comparison

The question for our TheServerSide.NET readers...
Which of these features are of most interest or importance to you? Or if you have a personal wish list, what feature would you most like to see added to the next version of Visual Studio?

Okay, so it's really a dozen and not a baker's dozen. But this could be a fun and interesting discussion, so please respond using the 'Post Reply' button.

A Baker's Dozen of New Features in Orcas
http://blogs.counterpunchsoftware.com/2007/03/baker-dozen-of-new-features-in-orcas.htm
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Mar 12, 2007

Using .NET Classes To Simplify Printing




If I could figure out where each of my gray hairs came from,

I bet that programming Windows printing would a major cause.

I think most programmers would agree that writing code to create top-quality printed output is a real chore. For example, in Visual Basic classic, you were limited to using the PrintForm method and the Printer object - workable, but hardly easy! Other pre-.NET programming tools had similar limitations, if not always as serious as that one.

Fortunately, .NET's class library offers truly significant improvements in the way printing from an application is handled. From the ground up, printing is treated as just another kind of graphical operation, no different from displaying graphics on the screen (in .NET the term "graphics" encompasses text as well as lines, shapes, and so on).

This is not a new concept - other programming tools have treated the printed page as just another drawing surface - but the way that .NET implements it breaks new ground in power and ease of use.

This means that to understand printing in .NET you must understand its graphics capabilities. I can give only the briefest of overviews here before getting to the details of printing. All printing-related classes are in the System.Drawing.Printing namespace.

The Graphics class is the heart of all .NET's graphics capabilities. This class encapsulates a GDI+ drawing surface and is involved in essentially all graphics operations that a program performs. It provides methods for drawing text and a wide variety of shapes. Typically, a program will use the Graphics object that is passed to a form's Paint event procedure to draw to the screen. Here's a simple example:

Private Sub Form1_Paint(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As _
System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs) Handles MyBase.Paint

Dim g As Graphics = e.Graphics

' Define a rectangle.
Dim r As New Rectangle(25, 25, 200, 150)
' Draw it with a black pen.
g.DrawRectangle(Pens.Black, r)
' Add some text.
Dim f As New Font("Times", 24)
g.DrawString("Printing", f, Brushes.Red, 70, 80)

End Sub

Figure 1An example of .NET graphics output.

Figure 1 shows the resulting screen output. Note that most programs do not actually put the drawing code in the Paint event procedure, but rather in one or more independent procedures that are called from this event procedure.

There's lots more to the Graphics class, but that's not the subject of this article. We want to know how .NET integrates printing with the standard on-screen graphics operations. The answer lies in the PrintDocument class, which encapsulates almost all of .NET's printing functionality. Most important, the PrintDocument class also encapsulates a Graphics object that represents the printer. In broad overview, here's how this works:

  1. Write a procedure that uses the Graphics class to create the desired output.
  2. Create an instance of the PrintDocument class.
  3. Connect the procedure created in Step 1 to the PrintPage event of the PrintDocument object. You do this with Visual Basic's AddressOf operator.
  4. Call the PrintDocument object's Print method.

Let's see how this works for printing the output shown in figure 1. The first step is to write the procedure that uses Graphics class methods to create the output. This procedure can have any name you like, but it must have the correct signature (number and type of arguments) as shown here:

Private Sub pd_PrintPage(ByVal sender As Object, _
ByVal e As PrintPageEventArgs)

Dim g As Graphics = e.Graphics

' Define a rectangle.
Dim r As New Rectangle(25, 25, 200, 150)
' Draw it with a black pen.
g.DrawRectangle(Pens.Black, r)
' Add some text.
Dim f As New Font("Times", 24)
g.DrawString("Printing", f, Brushes.Red, 70, 80)

End Sub

There's two things to pay attention to in this procedure. First, it is passed a Graphics object as part of the PrintPageEventArgs object. This is the Graphics object that is connected to the printer and is, therefore, the Graphics object that you'll use to create output. Second, the actual drawing code is exactly the same as we used earlier to display the rectangle and text on-screen.

The remaining three steps are accomplished together in the following code. In this case, it is in a Button control's event procedure:

Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, _
ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click

' Create a PrintDocument object
Dim prDoc As New PrintDocument
' Link the printing procedure with the PrintPage event.
AddHandler prDoc.PrintPage, AddressOf Me.pd_PrintPage
'Start printing.
prDoc.Print()

End Sub

The result is the box and text printed on the system's default printer. In this example, the code for screen display and the for printer output are in different procedures, but the beauty of .NET is that they do not have to be. More commonly, you will write a single procedure for output - this procedure is passed a reference to the Graphics object to use. Here's the procedure for our example:

Private Sub DrawOutput(ByVal g As Graphics)

' Define a rectangle.
Dim r As New Rectangle(25, 25, 200, 150)
' Draw it with a black pen.
g.DrawRectangle(Pens.Black, r)
' Add some text.
Dim f As New Font("Times", 24)
g.DrawString("Printing", f, Brushes.Red, 70, 80)

End Sub

Then, your code calls this procedure from the Paint event procedure for screen output or from the PrintPage procedure for printed output, passing the correct Graphics reference in each case. This enables the same drawing code to perform double duty, for screen display and printing:

Private Sub pd_PrintPage(ByVal sender As Object, _
ByVal e As PrintPageEventArgs)

DrawOutput(e.Graphics)

End Sub

Private Sub Form1_Paint(ByVal sender As Object, _
ByVal e As System.Windows.Forms.PaintEventArgs) Handles MyBase.Paint

DrawOutput(e.Graphics)

End Sub

Dealing With Settings

So far, we have looked at .NET printing at its simplest. There's a lot more to it, as you might well suspect. It's unavoidable that printing involves certain complications that are not present for screen display. These include:

  • Printer settings associated with a print job. These settings are related to the printer hardware, controlling things such as the printer to use, the paper source, and the number of copies.
  • Page settings. These control page-related characteristics, such as paper size and margins.

Figure 2Figure 2: The printer settings dialog box.

.NET makes it relatively painless to deal with these settings. Printer settings are handled by the PrintDialog class. This class presents the standard print settings dialog box which is used in many Windows applications, as shown in Figure 2. The user can select a printer, set the printer properties (using the printer driver software), and choose other printer settings (See Figure 2).

Here's how it works:

  1. Create an instance of the PrintDialog class.
  2. Set the PrintDialog object's Document property to the PrintDocument object that is being used for the print job.
  3. Display the printer settings dialog box by calling the ShowDialog method.
  4. Verify that the user closed the printer settings dialog box by clicking OK (rather than Cancel). Then, start the print job by calling the PrintDocument.Print method.

Because the PrintDialog object was associated with the print job in Step 2, the settings that the user chooses in this dialog box are automatically applied to the print job. Here's a modification of an earlier listing that displays the printer settings dialog box before starting the print job.

Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, _
ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click

' Create a PrintDocument object
Dim prDoc As New PrintDocument
' Link the printing procedure with the PrintPage event.
AddHandler prDoc.PrintPage, AddressOf Me.pd_PrintPage< ' Create the printer settings dialog box and associate ' it with the PrintDocument object. Dim prDlg As New PrintDialog prDlg.Document = prDoc ' Display dialog. If user closes dialog with OK, ' start printing. if prDlg.ShowDialog = DialogResult.OK Then prDoc.Print() End Sub
Figure 3Figure 3: The page settings dialog box.

Page settings are handled in a similar manner. You use the PageSetupDialog class in a manner that parallels the technique for PrintDialog class that I just described, associating it with the PrintDocument object and then displaying it to the user. This dialog box is shown in Figure 3. The user can select the paper source and size as well as orientation and margins.

You do not have to use the PrintDialog and PageSetupDialog classes in your program. In fact, for maximum printing control you cannot use these classes, because the dialog boxes do not provide access to some settings, particularly regarding page setup. If you need all the printing control possible, you'd use the PageSettings class, which encapsulates all available page settings but has no visual interface. You would design your own page settings dialog box to let the user make selections, then put this data in a PageSettings object, and then associate that object with the print job's PrintDocument object.

There's a lot more to .NET printing that cannot be covered here. Once you start working with the printing-related classes I think you'll agree that with .NET, Microsoft has made printing... well, perhaps not exactly easy, but certainly easier!

Peter Aitken has been writing about Windows applications and programming for more than 10 years. His books include Visual Basic.Net Programming with Peter Aitken(ISBN 1576109615). Peter operates a private consulting firm that provides programming, Web design, and technical writing services to business and government.

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Mar 3, 2007

Mar 2, 2007

Vista Software announces VistaDB 3.0 as world's first fully managed embedded SQL database engine for Microsoft .NET Framework, Compact Framework, Wind


Vista Software fills hole in Microsoft's database strategy for .NET by releasing a preview of the world's first fully managed embedded SQL database engine for building WinForms and ASP.NET applications based on the Microsoft .NET Framework and Compact Framework


VistaDB 3.0 Features

VistaDB 3.0 features the following:

  • Fully managed and typesafe single assembly developed in Visual C#
  • Small 600KB embedded footprint
  • Microsoft SQL Server T-SQL compatible SQL syntax
  • Managed ADO.NET Provider
  • Supports building WinForms and ASP.NET database applications
  • Supports the Microsoft .NET Framework, Compact Framework, Windows Vista and Mono
  • Unicode support
  • Snapshot Isolation level transaction processing that eliminates deadlocks
  • 4TB of storage per database
  • Direct Data Access™ objects for high-speed live cursor support
  • Deep integration into the Visual Studio 2005 IDE including support for Server Explorer
  • Managed Data Builder tool allows developers to visually create and manage databases
  • Managed Data Migration Wizard migrates existing databases to VistaDB format
  • Royalty free distribution
Click Here To Read Full Article

Home Page :http://www.vistadb.net/default.asp
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Mar 1, 2007

What is WinFX -The New Programming Interface Introduced in Windows "Longhorn"

Learn the object-oriented, managed API for the breadth of Windows "Longhorn" and how it relates to the work you are already doing on the .NET Framework.


Details
Date Published: November 07, 2003
Length: 00:09:51
Product/Technology: .NET Framework, Longhorn
Level: 100: The technical level of introductory and overview material. Assumes little or no expertise with topic and covers topic concepts, functions, features, benefits.100

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Watch the Video




Brad Abrams discusses how "Longhorn" relates to the work you already do on the .NET Framework.
Brad Abrams discusses how "Longhorn" relates to the work you already do on the .NET Framework.
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Use Full Library For .NET


Reflector for .NET
Reflector is the class browser, explorer, analyzer and documentation viewer for .NET. Reflector allows to easily view, navigate, search, decompile and analyze .NET assemblies in C#, Visual Basic and IL.
Download :Refector.zip




Resourcer for .NET
Resourcer is an editor for .resources binaries and .resX XML file formats used with the .NET platform. Resourcer allows editing of name/string pairs, import of bitmaps/icons and and merging of resources from different sources.
Download : Resourcer.zip




CommandBar for .NET
The CommandBar class library extends Windows Forms with classes for CommandBar, ReBar, CoolBar, and bitmaped menu controls. 24 bit alpha channel images are supported on Windows 2000.
Download : CommandBar.zip





Writer for .NET
Writer is a simple WYSIWYG editor for HTML files. The program allows you to edit HTML files using simple editing functionality like Undo, Redo, Cut, Copy, Paste, Find, Replace. Writer also supports text layout and formatting, hyperlink editing and insertion of dates and pictures.
Download : Writer.zip



Mapack for .NET
Mapack is a .NET class library for basic linear algebra computations. It supports Norm1, Norm2, Frobenius Norm, Determinant, Infinity Norm, Rank, Condition, Trace, Cholesky, LU, QR, single value decomposition, least squares solver and eigenproblems.
Download :Mapack.zip
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